Crunchy Bottoms

Striking the caloric balance. Barely.

Monthly Archives: June 2011

Le Cafe Confectionery & Pastry

Le Cafe Confectionery & Pastry

There are few things in this world that are silky smooth and crunchy all at the same time.

Here are my top three:

1. Zha Liang/ Zha Leong – Dough Fritters wrapped in Rice Rolls.

2. Egg Tarts from Tong Heng.

3. Bean Curd Tarts.

You’ll see plenty of Zha Leongs in future posts, because I’ve been hunting down the best in Sg, and I’ve loved Tong Heng egg tarts since they started out from being sold at $0.90 till the $1.40 that they are now. Tempting little buggers are the ultimate sin whenever I’m in the Maxwell area.

And then there are these tempting cretins whenever I’m in the Middle Road area – which is pretty much every day now.

Bean Curd Tarts ($8 for 8)

Read more of this post

Advertisements

Wholemeal Sourdough

Wholemeal Sourdough

I have bad news.

While this piece of news may not exactly bother much of anyone, it bothers me on a very emotional, fundamental, devastating level.

Someone threw away my 8-month-old sourdough starter from the fridge.

This wasn’t so much a proper sourdough starter since I used the Old Dough method of acquiring sourdough – I add this piece of dough to every batch of sourdough I make, cut off a piece from the main bulk of dough, keep it in a bowl covered with plastic wrap, and let it sit in the fridge until I make a new batch where the process repeats again.

It’s not quite as exciting as the conventional way of creating sourdough, since I hear that intimately naming a newborn sourdough starter is just one of the thousand of loony things bread fanatics do from time to time for their sourdough starters.

Wholemeal Sourdough

Read more of this post

Cocotte – French country cooking

Hotel Wanderlust - Cocotte

When people think French, they think stifling fine-dining, measly portions, extravagant black tie affairs for people who have the luxury of time and money. I’m not going to lie that French food isn’t pricey, but I must draw a distinction between the classes of the French cuisine.

In layman terms, you have the fanciful – but no less artful – fine-dining style of cuisine, and then you have the tuck-a-napkin-into-your-collar-and-get-right-in-there peasant-style of French cooking.

Fresh flowers. No-frills decor.

For all those afraid of formality, well, you can chuck out that bowtie of yours because it’s just going to get in the way of the food and your mouth, and if anything, it’ll only be useful as far as that dribble of sauce down your chin is concerned. At Cocotte, you get incredibly rich gravies so thick they don’t splatter, hearty portions of meat and potatoes and all sorts of root vegetables, and flawless (and very liberal) amalgams of butter and wine.

You get down-to-earth, sincere food.

When I heard that Cocotte was nestled within a boutique hotel, named Wanderlust, one with 4 thematic floors, each designed by Singaporean designing agencies, and after chancing across pictures of their quirky, edgy rooms, I knew I had to pop by sometime. Not so much to see the rooms, of course, because that’ll just be odd since I have no reason to spend the night in Little India, but just to, you know, get a feel of the place since the very name of the hotel just reflects my longstanding affliction of not being able to travel much.

And then I actually saw pictures of Cocotte, the spunky yet provincial decor, with splashes of Le Creuset-themed colours (bold reds, blues, yellows, oranges, whites and blacks…) against rustic, unlacquered wooden furnishings, and saw pictures of the kinds of French country-style foods they whip up, and I really should have contained myself, but I didn’t – I made a reservation.

Beouf Bourguignon (supplement of $12 for the $29-per-pax set lunch)

Read more of this post

The Wooden Spoon

Wooden Spoon

UR has been taking up tons of my time these past two weeks, but if anything, it has given me a wealth of opportunity to meet the people behind humble establishments, to sample cuisines I’d otherwise never try, and – best of all – bumped up my chances of stumbling across hidden gems.

How I’ve managed to waltz by The Wooden Spoon the bajillion times I’ve made my way to Tom’s Palette is beyond me. I mean, it’s just right beside it! I’m talking about like 10cm away. Grab your cup of ice cream and shimmy over for $1 scones.

Good $1 scones.

Lordie, I want one now.

Blueberry Muffin! ($1.30)

Read more of this post